Provision patient remembered for spirit of generosity, hope

Posted by on Thursday, June 30th, 2016

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Philip and Lydia Parks traveled the world in search of a cure for 15-year-old Philip’s aggressive brain cancer that took them to Germany, Israel and Provision.

After multiple surgeries, proton therapy and up-and-coming immunotherapy treatments, his body gave up the fight. Philip died on April 13, 2016. But his mother is dedicated to remembering Philip’s story not as one of sadness but of hope.

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Provision patients enjoy a little vacation too

Posted by on Thursday, June 23rd, 2016

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Provision Center for Proton Therapy patient Wayne Mason may have come for cancer treatment, but weeks spent in Knoxville also gave him an opportunity to see the local sights! And he was impressed. Here’s his must-do list of local activities in and around Knoxville and beyond!

In Knoxville

  • Neyland Stadium tour—Great for college football fans! $8. Phillip Fulmer Way. (865)974-1205. Reservation required
  • James White Fort—Awesome historical tour of the homestead of Knoxville’s founder.  The frontier sitting in the middle of downtown (beside the Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame). 205 Hill Avenue Southeast. 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. (865) 525-6514.

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Exercise, diet boost cancer survival rate

Posted by on Thursday, June 16th, 2016

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Good lifestyle choices are always important. For those with a cancer diagnosis, they can be even more so.

It is critical to maintain the key activities that encourage good health throughout cancer treatment and after. Good habits such as physical activity and a healthy diet affect not only the outcome of treatment but the quality of life during and after treatment.

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Sneak peek: Provision’s proton therapy future

Posted by on Friday, June 10th, 2016

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This past week’s 1,000th patient celebration culminated a whirlwind week of progress for Provision and its quest to make proton therapy as available and accessible as any other cancer treatment.

 

In short: More patients than ever are coming to Provision Center for Proton Therapy in Knoxville. And Provision will soon be delivering protons to patients around the world.

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Provision reaches 1000-patient milestone!

Posted by on Tuesday, June 7th, 2016

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The gong—three clangs that echo through the lobby, treatment rooms, work station cubicles. It’s startling for first-time visitors and new employees.

It quickly becomes the joyous reminder of why we’re here.

Today, the 1000th patient rang the graduation bell to applause of patients, former graduates, employees and supporters of the Provision Center for Proton Therapy.

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Provision celebrates cancer survivors

Posted by on Sunday, June 5th, 2016

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On this, National Cancer Survivors Day, we take a moment just to appreciate. Life. Health. Survival.

Those who receive a cancer diagnosis no longer take those things for granted. They have become a precious gift. Something to be celebrated. But, better to hear the words of those who’ve been there. Below are thoughts from two young cancer survivors and Provision alumni. You can read the stories of their cancer journeys, and many others, at ProtonStories.com.

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Provision grows proton therapy in China

Posted by on Friday, June 3rd, 2016

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China is excited about proton therapy and for good reason.

Officially, 3.5 million Chinese per year are diagnosed with cancer. And 2.2 million people die of cancer, according to the World Health Organization. In the U.S., 70 percent of those with cancer survive five years after treatment. In China, just 30 percent survive to their five-year anniversary. Treatment is hard to come by—there is less than one conventional radiation therapy machine per million people in China compared to more than 12 machines per million in the U.S., for example. And in China diagnosis often happens too late.

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